An Encounter on Oxley Road

Shortly after the tragedy at Stringybark Creek, James Wallace was traveling along the Oxley road with a few friends, when Joe passed them riding Music, headed in the direction of Sebastopol.During the Royal Commission, Wallace recounted the following:'I met Byrne one moonlight night on the Oxley road, going in the direction of Sebastopol from Greta. … Continue reading An Encounter on Oxley Road

A Bottle of Brandy from Moon’s Pioneer Hotel

Early in the hours of the 28th October 1878, having ridden across the rain drenched Oxley Flats from Greta, Joe knocked at the door of Moon’s Pioneer Hotel, while the other three waited across the road on horseback, and purchased a bottle of brandy. Briefly warmed by the liquor, they rode across the bridge toward … Continue reading A Bottle of Brandy from Moon’s Pioneer Hotel

Not a Bloodthirsty Scoundrel

‘Dan Kelly was the youngest of “Red” Kelly’s three sons. All accounts of him show that he was of a quieter and less forceful nature than his brother Ned, although the general public have been led, through the vicious misrepresentation by the police, to regard him as a treacherous and bloodthirsty scoundrel. This misrepresentation was … Continue reading Not a Bloodthirsty Scoundrel

The Day Ned Kelly Wrote to the Herald

'We have received from an anonymous correspondent who is evidently a sympathiser with, and a near associate of the Kellys and their companions, a long but rambling statement of the case as it is put by the outlaws. The document, which contains sixteen pages, came by post simply addressed to "The editor of the Herald newspaper, Melbourne." It is evidently written by an illiterate person, the orthography being defective, the calligraphy in some portions almost undecipherable, and the composition rambling and sometimes unintelligible. Sufficient can be gathered, however, to show that there is a very bitter feeling of animosity among the sympathisers of the outlaws against the police, and reasons are stated why they should exist. An inquiry is anxiously demanded, and as the statements made are of a serious character, and the demand for an inquiry apparently a justifiable one, we give some particulars from the citation of our anonymous correspondent, who, for aught we know, may be one of the gang.